KHN Morning Briefing

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Perspectives On The Trump Budget: Questionable Math; Who Feels The Most Pain?

Editorial pages across the country include analysis and review of President Donald Trump's fiscal blueprint, including some tough talk about its political and policy implications.

The New York Times: Trump’s Budget: The Math Is Phony But The Cruelty Isn’t
Phony math is a time-honored tradition in the Washington world of budget making, but the first full fiscal plan from the Trump administration breaks new ground. The bottom line: A budget that the White House says will be in balance by 2027 would, in reality, remain deeply in red ink throughout the coming decade and ultimately add trillions of dollars to the national debt. ... This budget’s blatant disregard for intellectual integrity is matched by the extraordinary extent to which it seeks to slash social welfare programs, including another $616 billion out of Medicaid on top of $800 billion that would be sliced as part of the Republicans’ health care plan. That’s a 28 percent reduction to the existing Medicaid budget plan. (Steven Rattner, 5/24)

Chicago Tribune: Trump's Budget: A Slow Boat To Disaster
The plan has been assailed by Democrats and various activist groups for coddling the rich, punishing the poor and shortchanging important functions. Trump proposes to cut outlays for Medicaid, food stamps, Head Start and Social Security disability. Ditto for Environmental Protection Agency enforcement and State Department security. He would close the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. (Steve Chapman, 5/24)

Forbes: Trump's Budget For Seniors: Bad, But It Could Have Been Worse
The best that can be said about President Trump’s 2018 budget and older adults: It could have been worse. In a fiscal plan focused on historic domestic spending cuts, programs for older adults were hit by substantial reductions, though not slashed as deeply as other domestic programs. Medicare was largely untouched. So was Social Security for seniors, although Trump would tighten eligibility and reduce some benefits in the Social Security disability program. (Howard Gleckman, 5/23)

The Des Moines Register: Donald Trump 2018 Budget Could Turn Off His Voters And Sink His Approval Rating
The best way to think about the fiscal 2018 budget released by the White House is as a Trump political campaign rally on paper. The budget was clearly developed to make a statement to President Trump’s base of voters in the hope that they will see it as him keeping his campaign promises. According to Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, the budget will be in surplus in 10 years, construction will start on the wall between the U.S. and Mexico, there will be more money for enforcing immigration laws, and there will be much more for the Pentagon. Meanwhile, wasteful government spending will be cut and taxes will be reduced. (Stan Collender, 5/24)

Louisville Courier-Journal: Tell Congress The Budget Must Provide For The Poor
“A preferential option for the poor” is a fundamental concept in Catholic social teaching. Though the phrase itself is only 50 years old, it derives from Jesus’ Gospel message to pay special attention to poverty. ... The concept is shared by many religions and has become part of the ethos of the United States. Whether through Social Security, Medicaid, food stamps or foreign aid, our nation has recognized that our worth is judged by how we treat the most vulnerable among us. ... The U.S. Congress is now considering a budget proposal by the current administration. So many helped in this country and abroad would be devastated by this budget. (Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz, 5/24)

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