Total Results: 4969

One In 12 Physicians Have Accepted Payments From Opioid Drugmakers

KHN Morning Briefing

The study comes amid a raging epidemic across the country in which physician prescribing has been identified as a key factor. Meanwhile, states are taking steps to limit the number of painkillers a doctor can prescribe, and officials tout the benefits of declaring an emergency over the crisis.

VA To Flex Powers Of New Law That Makes It Easier To Fire Department Employees

KHN Morning Briefing

Brian Hawkins, the former director of the agency’s main medical center in D.C. which a report found to be plagued by the “highest levels of chaos,” was fired in late July. The government’s Merit Systems Protection Board issued a stay on the decision, but now VA Secretary David Shulkin has another tool to make the firing stick.

N.H., ‘Ground Zero’ Of Opioid Epidemic, Sues OxyContin-Maker Over Its Marketing Tactics

KHN Morning Briefing

Suing the companies that make the painkillers is a new trend in states’ efforts to combat the crisis. The New Hampshire case comes less than two months after Missouri’s attorney general sued Purdue and two other pharmaceutical companies. In other news, a study finds that abuse-deterrent opioids aren’t effective and investors are flocking to a company that makes a medication that treats addiction.

Young People On ‘Brink Of The Worst Mental Health Crisis In Decades,’ Expert Warns

KHN Morning Briefing

Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, talks about how attachment to smartphones and social media is proving damaging to the mental health of those in the “iGen” generation. In other public health news: sunscreen, malaria, heart disease, a mysterious illness, smoking and damaged skin cells.

Doctor’s Murder Raises Tough Questions About Battling Opioid Epidemic

KHN Morning Briefing

Dr. Todd Graham refused to give a patient a pain killer prescription. The woman’s husband returned with threats and a gun. Graham’s death is serving as a stark reminder to the community that doctors are on the front lines of the crisis. Meanwhile, deaths from drug overdoses in the U.S. rose sharply in the first nine months of 2016.