Lauren Sausser

Tras Uvalde, cirujanos de trauma detallan los horrores de las masacres, y reclaman cambios

KHN Original

En estos años, la profesión médica ha desarrollado técnicas como la rápida evacuación de pacientes para salvar a un mayor número de víctimas de tiroteos. Pero traumatólogos cirujanos entrevistados por KHN dicen que incluso esas mejoras solo pueden salvar a una fracción de los pacientes cuando son heridas infligidas por rifles de tipo militar.

Addressing the ‘Trust Factor’: South Carolina Researchers Tackle Health Disparities Using Genetics

KHN Original

A new genetic research project underway in South Carolina aims to reduce health disparities between Black and white residents — such as cancer and cardiovascular disease rates — that have long ranked among the nation’s worst. But researchers face the challenge of recruiting 100,000 participants who reflect the diversity of South Carolina. And history isn’t on their side.

‘Almost Like Malpractice’: To Shed Bias, Doctors Get Schooled to Look Beyond Obesity

KHN Original

Research has long shown that doctors are less likely to respect patients who are overweight or obese — terms that now apply to nearly three-quarters of adults in the U.S. The Association of American Medical Colleges plans to roll out new diversity, equity, and inclusion standards aimed at teaching doctors, among other things, how to treat patients who are overweight with respect.

Persistent Problem: High C-Section Rates Plague the South

KHN Original

Some U.S. states have reduced use of the procedure, including by sharing C-section data with doctors and hospitals. But change has proved difficult in the South, where women are generally less healthy heading into their pregnancies and maternal and infant health problems are among the highest in the U.S.

Profit Strategy: Psychiatric Facilities Prioritize Out-of-State Kids

KHN Original

Nearly all psychiatric residential treatment centers for children in South Carolina operate as for-profit businesses — some backed by private equity — and many prioritize out-of-state kids because it’s better for the bottom line. The scramble to secure treatment for children and teenagers has become so competitive that South Carolina will spend millions more each year as of April 1 to keep out-of-state patients from flooding the state’s treatment facilities.