KHN Original Stories

Latest Kaiser Health News Stories

Federally Funded Obria Prescribes Abstinence To Stop The Spread Of STDs

KHN Original

Obria, a Christian medical chain, was awarded federal family planning funds for its California clinics for the first time this year. Clinics receiving Title X funds are expected to treat and prevent sexually transmitted diseases. Obria’s prohibition against condoms means its prevention efforts rest on abstinence, even as STD rates surge.

Why Hospitals Are Getting Into The Housing Business

KHN Original

Hospital systems now invest in housing to help some of their most frequent patients. This allows them to safely discharge patients who otherwise would have no place to go, freeing up beds for sicker patients and saving the hospitals money.

KHN’s ‘What The Health?’: Trump Turns To Medicare

KHN Original

President Donald Trump, dogged by an impeachment inquiry, tries to change the subject by unveiling an executive order aimed at expanding the role of private Medicare health plans. The Trump administration also launched an effort this week to expand “wellness” programs aimed at getting people with insurance to practice better health habits – even though research has shown the efforts don’t generally improve health or save money. This week, Alice Miranda Ollstein of Politico, Kimberly Leonard of the Washington Examiner and Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call join KHN’s Julie Rovner to discuss these issues and more.

Georgia Sheriff’s Deputy Sues Over Lack Of Transgender Insurance Coverage

KHN Original

A sheriff’s deputy in central Georgia filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Houston County, whose employee insurance plan has denied coverage for her transgender-related health care. The decision would likely result in a ruling that affects the entire state, if not the entire Southeast, and comes after decisions in Wisconsin and Iowa sided with other transgender patients.

The Deep Divide: State Borders Create Medicaid Haves And Have-Nots

KHN Original

State borders can highlight Medicaid’s arbitrary coverage. On the Missouri side of the Mississippi River, low-income people struggle with untreated health issues. But on the Illinois side, people in similar straits can get health care because their state expanded its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act.