Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Aid-In-Dying Law Falls Within Scope Of Improving Californians’ Health, AG Argues In Appeal Of Judge’s Decision

KHN Morning Briefing

A judge recently overturned the legislation, saying it was passed illegally in a special session that was supposed to focus on specific health care issues. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra cited Calif. Gov. Jerry Brown’s statement from when he signed the bill into law as an example of how the measure fits into the scope of the special session.

Is New York City Ready For Supervised Injection Sites For Heroin Users?

KHN Morning Briefing

As New York mulls supervised injection sites, officials can look to Canada for a real-life example of how the idea plays out beyond theoretical discussions. And in other news on the national drug crisis: elder abuse; and death rates may have crested in Ohio.

Among Surgery’s Potential Complications For Older Patients: Cognitive Losses

KHN Morning Briefing

The Washington Post reports on this condition, which is known as post-operative cognitive decline. Though symptoms present in many ways, patients who experience it often face memory problems, difficulty multitasking, learning new things and setting priorities. Also in the news, the New York Times offers some tips on how to age well and stay at home.

Barbara Bush Is Receiving Comfort Care — Here’s What That Entails

KHN Morning Briefing

It was announced that former first lady Barbara Bush will not seek further medical treatment beyond comfort care for her failing health. People who opt for comfort care receive treatment only for their symptoms, such as shortness of breath or pain, rather than trying to prolong life.

It Can Be ‘Next To Impossible’ To Find Nursing Facilities That Will Accept Patients Recovering From Opioid Addiction

KHN Morning Briefing

Legal experts say that nursing facilities rejecting patients on addiction medication violates the Americans with Disabilities Act, yet an investigation finds that it’s a common practice. In more news on the crisis: medical groups are advocating for a new reimbursement model of physicians who treat opioid patients; researchers find that organ transplants from overdose victims fare as well as from traditional donors; West Virginia reaches a settlement with a pharmacy over its distributing practices; and more.

Genetic Testing Is A Hot New Benefit For Employees, But Researchers Say It Might Do More Harm Than Good

KHN Morning Briefing

Experts caution that extending use of the tests to the broader population may lead some people of average risk to forgo recommended screenings or, on the flip side, lead to unnecessary and extreme medical procedures. In other public health news: a smart gun, drug-resistant typhoid, viruses, hypertension, the dangers of sitting, bright lights for hospital patients, and more.

Lessons Learned From Treating Victims Of Boston Marathon Bombing Have Led To Key Medical Advances

KHN Morning Briefing

“The collective experience in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing was a very positive one in the medical community because there was a lot of crosstalk between military and civilian surgeons,” said Dr. Benjamin Potter, chief of orthopedics at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland. In other public health news: cancer, HIV, embryos, vaccinations, and aging.