Latest Morning Briefing Stories

From Salves To Sprays: CBD Comes In Many Popular Forms, But Claims ‘Are A Snake Oil In A Sense,’ Scientists Say

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While it’s known that Cannabidiol is the part of the cannabis plant that won’t get you high, there are few trials to support claims that it aids a range of problems from anxiety to diabetes. Public health news also report on the longterm effects of childhood punishments; pitting germs against each other; mental health benefits of going to green spaces; a quit-smoking message in an obit; smoking’s impact on vision; Ireland’s rising HIV rates; a giant fighter against Ebola retires; minimizing risks of falling and how to be a better talker, as well.

More And More, People With Alzheimer’s Are Shrugging Off Outdated ‘Tragedy Narrative’ And Finding Joy In Dementia

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It might be better to try a more adaptive, counterintuitive approach to the disease, some health experts are now saying. Earlier generations approached the disease with shame and frustration, which is “extremely unhelpful to families and their elders,” says geriatrician Bill Thomas. News on public health focuses on sepsis; sunscreen; black lung disease; food allergies; HIV wellness; health care at the drugstore and dietary supplements, as well.

WHO Plans To Develop International Guidelines For Human Gene Editing After Controversial Work From Chinese Scientist

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The 18-member committee representing the World Health Organization will meet in March and begin to address calls for standards that scientists could adhere to. News on public health looks at an increase of heart attacks among young women; child flu deaths; a teen survey on mental health; sleep deprivation and health; a shortage of female surgeons; and HIV in rural America.

Stay Away From Trendy Unproven ‘Young Blood Transfusions,’ FDA Warns Consumers

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“Simply put we’re concerned that some patients are being preyed upon by unscrupulous actors touting treatments of plasma from young donors as cures and remedies,” top health officials said. The transfusions, which involve pumping a young person’s blood into the consumer, are marketed toward preventing aging, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other serious disease.

When Being Tied Down To Kidney Dialysis Is Unappealing, An Alternative Option Few Are Told About Can Help Older Patients

KHN Morning Briefing

More than 200,000 patients age 65 and older receive dialysis and are often told they’d die without it, yet few are informed about a conservative option that helps manage the disease. Public health news also looks at spanking; gay Catholic priests; CBD oil; a CRISPR patent; unsafe radiation exposure; presidents’ public speech patterns; new Ebola treatments and more.

The Science Of Science: Smaller Is Better When It Comes To Building Innovative Teams

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A study published in Nature mines large databases and reports that while big teams help drive progress, they are best suited for confirming novel findings, rather than generating them. Public health news also looks at beneficial insects; a failed uterus transplant; chronic inflammation’s toll on memory; income predictors at age 6; and aging-in-place pitfalls.

Nobel Prize Winning Economist Develops Kidney Transplant ‘Chains’ That Are Saving Lives

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Nobel laureate Alvin Roth deserves much of the credit for coming up with a solution for increasing the number of donors and getting people off dialysis sooner. Other public health news focuses on self-harming images; Duchenne muscular dystrophy; hangover prevention; cocktail safety; living alone; breast implants and more.

Racist Northam Photo Rocks Already-Shaky Trust African-American Community Has With Medical Professionals

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African-Americans have long complained of being ignored by doctors and having their concerns downplayed, with several studies over the years even showing that white doctors sometimes think black patients are less likely to feel pain. The controversy over Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, who was graduating from medical school at the time the blackface photo was published, has, for some, reaffirmed that mistrust. In other public health news: Alzheimer’s, wildfires, e-cigarettes, HIV-tainted blood and more.

‘Remarkable’ Study Finds That Hypertension Patients Who Received Intensive Treatment Were Less Likely To Develop Memory Problems

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The study is the first to find a way for patients to lower their risk of mild cognitive impairment. “I think it actually is very exciting because it tells us that by improving vascular health in a comprehensive way, we could actually have an effect on brain health,” said Dr. Kristine Yaffe, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at University of California San Francisco.

Internet Addiction: It Doesn’t Have A Medical Classification Yet, But A ‘Wave Of Problems’ Is Spurring Concerns, Researcher Say

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Mental health centers in Florida, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and other states are adding in-patient internet addiction treatment to their line of services. But some health experts view internet addiction as a false condition. Public health news also focuses on a potential cure for sickle-cell; lessons from a Rwandan medical school; dealing with dementia in the workplace; an overlooked, dangerous infection; tips to avoid a cold; prediction models for pandemics; secrets of unlocking mysterious fascia; naming and taming your anger and problems with scooters.

Causation Or Correlation?: ‘Strong Evidence’ Of A Link Between Gum Disease And Alzheimer’s Discovered

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The research found that bacteria associated with gum disease was also in 96 percent of the brains of people with Alzheimer’s used in the study. But more research will need to be done to determine exactly what role it plays in the progression of the disease. In other public health news: transgender students, sleep, the Doomsday clock, Photoshopping, paid parental leave, climate change, and more.

For Children With Food Sensitivities, Sometimes Isolation Can Be More Detrimental Than The Allergy Itself

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A recent court case over a theater program and a child with a peanut allergy highlights the social isolation some young people deal with when they have a food allergy. “The child starts to feel like he or she is the problem,” said Dr. James Baker Jr., the director of the Mary H. Weiser Food Allergy Center at the University of Michigan. In other public health news: stem cells, embryos, physician burnout, vitamin D, sleep, mental health, and more.