Latest Morning Briefing Stories

As Health Law Enrollment Deadline Nears, Remember The Insurance That Looks Too Good To Be True Probably Is

KHN Morning Briefing

Some consumers in North Carolina are receiving robocalls that come across like ads for plans with names like “Trump Health Care” touting affordable coverage. But those options are often skimpy and don’t offer even some of the basic coverage Americans have grown used to under the Affordable Care Act. The deadline for signing up for a 2020 plan is Sunday. News comes out of Georgia, Florida and California, as well.

Lawmakers, Public Health Advocates Deeply Concerned Over Trump’s Apparent Reverse-Course On E-Cig Flavor Ban

KHN Morning Briefing

Following reports that President Donald Trump has changed his mind on the flavor ban, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D., Ill.) wrote to the OMB and FDA to inquire into the status of the proposed regulation on flavors. Public advocates were also left disappointed. “If the Trump administration backs off for political reasons, it will create a public health crisis that we will live with for decades,” Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, said. Meanwhile, California is joining the ranks of those suing Juul over its marketing.

Two Students Dead, Three More Victims Wounded At California High School In Latest Mass Shooting

KHN Morning Briefing

Saugus High School in Los Angeles is the latest site of a mass shooting, where a 16-year-old gunman opened fire on his fellow students and then turned the weapon on himself. There have been a total of 84 incidents of gunfire on school grounds in 2019, according to nonprofit group Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund. California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country.

Trump Slams Calif. Governor Over Perceived Failure To Curb Wildfires, But Draws Criticism For Not Understanding Cause Of Flames

KHN Morning Briefing

President Donald Trump threatened to withhold federal aid from California because of how Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) is handling the wildfires. But the tweets were quickly met with pushback, with Newsom saying, “You don’t believe in climate change. You are excused from this conversation.” Others accused the president of playing “political roulette with the lives of our firefighters.”

‘Don’t Let Your Guard Down’: Forecasters Fear Extreme Wind Will Bring New Level Of Fire Danger To Californians

KHN Morning Briefing

The National Weather Service office took the unusual step of labeling the fire weather conditions an “extreme red flag” warning to impart the severity of the situation. In other news on the wildfires: California’s disparities are put on display during disasters; a deepening skepticism emerges around PG&E’s power outage plan; parents worry about calming anxious children; and more.

California’s Disaster Response Tested As Wildfires Continue To Rage Alongside Evacuations, Power Outages

KHN Morning Briefing

Gov. Gavin Newsom said the state is working to ensure enough pharmacies are kept open on generators in communities without electricity so that residents have access to needed medications. Meanwhile, mandatory evacuations affected nearly 180,000 people. On Sunday, Newsom visited three evacuation centers in Petaluma, including one where three dozen patients from a skilled nursing facility specializing in dementia care were taken.

Data Continues To Point To THC As A Main Culprit In Vaping-Related Lung Illness Outbreak

KHN Morning Briefing

Of those who have fallen ill, about 85 percent reported using THC-containing products. But health officials say they’re continuing to look at a wide range of chemicals in trying to determine the causes for the outbreak. Meanwhile, NPR takes a look inside command central and at the doctors who are scrambling to investigate the disease.

The New Normal: How Humans Are Going To Have To Adjust To A World On Fire

KHN Morning Briefing

As California continues to burn for the third record year in a row, some experts warn that we need to reconcile the fact that fires aren’t going away. “I think the perception is that we’re supposed to control them. But in a lot of cases we cannot,” said John Abatzoglou, an associate professor at the University of Idaho. “And that may allow us to think a little bit differently about how we live with fire. We call it wildfire for reason — it’s not domesticated fire.”