Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Drunken Driving Epidemic Has Mostly Stagnated Over Past Decade. Experts Say It’s Time To Focus On Root Cause.

KHN Morning Briefing

Experts say law-enforcement authorities need to do a better job assessing all offenders to determine their risk of repeating. “It’s not as simple as saying don’t drink and then drive. These are people who have underlying issues we need to get to,” said traffic-safety consultant Pam Fischer. In other public health news: a miraculous story about the heart’s resilience, new dementia therapies, a testicle transplant, the responsibility of psychotherapists and porn-consumption, the cops’ use of lie-detecting software, and more.

Controversy Over Practice Of Indefinitely Detaining Immigrants Hasn’t Dissuaded Trump

KHN Morning Briefing

The Trump administration wants to expand the system of facilities where migrant families can be incarcerated for months or longer, despite the fact that numerous health experts have warned that detaining children for such lengths of time, even with their parents, can cause permanent psychological damage. In other news on the immigration crisis: accusations surround a death of a teen in U.S. custody; a suit against immigration pilot programs, and a ruling on the “public charge” rule.

Attorney General’s Veiled Comments Suggest Communities Criticizing Police Brutality Could End Up Losing Protection

KHN Morning Briefing

“The idea that the attorney general of the United States, the nation’s chief law enforcement officer, is recommending abandoning communities as retribution for pushing for police reform or criticizing policing practices, is profoundly dangerous and irresponsible,” said Vanita Gupta, the president and chief executive of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. Meanwhile, a new study found that police shootings of unarmed black Americans led to more infants who were born prematurely.

Americans’ Life Expectancy Drops For Third Year In Row, Signaling There’s ‘Something Terribly Wrong’ Going On

KHN Morning Briefing

Researchers say the grim new reality isn’t just limited to rural deaths of despair, but rather the numbers reflect that many different people living in all areas of the U.S. are struggling. “We need to look at root causes,” said Dr. Steven Woolf, the author’s lead study. “Something changed in the 1980s, which is when the growth in our life expectancy began to slow down compared to other wealthy nations.”

‘Trying To Reduce Anxiety’: Instagram Explores Ways To Take Away Likes, Improve Mental Health

KHN Morning Briefing

By removing users ability to see how many likes their followers got but allowing them to see likes on their own posts, might make social media less stressful. But marketing agencies say the change would not be beneficial for businesses looking to market through high-profile users. Other news on mental health comes from California, Connecticut, Wisconsin and Illinois.

PhRMA To Yank Millions In Funding From Nonprofit Geared Toward Helping Those Addicted To Opioids

KHN Morning Briefing

PhRMA, which is responsible for 90 percent of the Addiction Policy Forum’s funding, will walk back and then end its support by 2020. The forum was at the eye of previous controversy, with critics blasting the fact that most of its funding came from the drugmakers who they said were responsible for the crisis in the first place. News on the opioid epidemic comes out of Massachusetts and Ohio, as well.

Dems Who See Health Care As Winning Issue Increasingly Sounding Alarm Over Political Pitfalls Of ‘Medicare For All’

KHN Morning Briefing

Warnings are being issued at all levels of the party–from union members to candidates running in swing states. “We won in Kentucky and Louisiana, barely, in part, because we won on health care. I don’t think we can afford to lose on health care,” Gov. Gina Raimondo (D-R.I.) said. Meanwhile, industry opponents for “Medicare for All” are starting to go after the moderates’ health plans as well. In other election news, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) has a plan to expand mental health treatment.

Mental Health Followups Needed For Gun Victims Who Suffer For Years Even When Injuries Are Small, Study Says

KHN Morning Briefing

In some of the first research into longterm effects of gun violence, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania say not enough is being done to help tens of thousands of patients who can suffer for years from PTSD and other mental health problems following a shooting. Related news is also on: the effects of fatal police shootings and the lives of mass shooters.