Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Targeting People With Epilepsy: How A Tweet Brought On A Seizure And Why The Cyberbully Faces Assault Charges

KHN Morning Briefing

“These kinds of attacks need to be taken seriously,” said Allison Nichol, the Epilepsy Foundation’s director of legal advocacy. “There needs to be a very aggressive response, both by the foundation and by law enforcement.” More public health news reports on the mental health impact of fatal shootings, organ donations, some good (yes) and bad news about the flu, disposable one-use scopes, gender spin on research, cosmetics safety, and protections for prostitutes.

Sackler Family Shifted Billions Of Dollars From Purdue Into Trusts, Overseas Accounts As Opioid Crisis Intensified

KHN Morning Briefing

How much money the Sackler family has — and where they’re keeping it — is central to discussions about how much they owe in court cases over the role Purdue Pharma played in the opioid epidemic. The family offered to contribute at least $3 billion in cash as part of a settlement to resolve the suits, but a dozen states and other advocates want them to pay more. Meanwhile, Purdue quietly split ways with PhRMA.

Health Highlights In Congress’ $1.4 Trillion Spending Bill: Tobacco Age, ‘Cadillac Tax,’ Medical Research And More

KHN Morning Briefing

Lawmakers released details Monday of a bipartisan deal that would allocate $1.4 trillion in federal spending for the remainder of the fiscal year to avoid a shutdown. Among other health-related measures, it includes a provision raising the minimum purchasing age for tobacco to 21, which advocates say is a “good step” toward a “substantial reduction” in smoking among young people. Media outlets cover the ins and outs of the bills and the ways they touch on health care.

Drunken Driving Epidemic Has Mostly Stagnated Over Past Decade. Experts Say It’s Time To Focus On Root Cause.

KHN Morning Briefing

Experts say law-enforcement authorities need to do a better job assessing all offenders to determine their risk of repeating. “It’s not as simple as saying don’t drink and then drive. These are people who have underlying issues we need to get to,” said traffic-safety consultant Pam Fischer. In other public health news: a miraculous story about the heart’s resilience, new dementia therapies, a testicle transplant, the responsibility of psychotherapists and porn-consumption, the cops’ use of lie-detecting software, and more.

Controversy Over Practice Of Indefinitely Detaining Immigrants Hasn’t Dissuaded Trump

KHN Morning Briefing

The Trump administration wants to expand the system of facilities where migrant families can be incarcerated for months or longer, despite the fact that numerous health experts have warned that detaining children for such lengths of time, even with their parents, can cause permanent psychological damage. In other news on the immigration crisis: accusations surround a death of a teen in U.S. custody; a suit against immigration pilot programs, and a ruling on the “public charge” rule.

Attorney General’s Veiled Comments Suggest Communities Criticizing Police Brutality Could End Up Losing Protection

KHN Morning Briefing

“The idea that the attorney general of the United States, the nation’s chief law enforcement officer, is recommending abandoning communities as retribution for pushing for police reform or criticizing policing practices, is profoundly dangerous and irresponsible,” said Vanita Gupta, the president and chief executive of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. Meanwhile, a new study found that police shootings of unarmed black Americans led to more infants who were born prematurely.