Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Ohio Governor Releases Gun Violence Plan With ‘Red Flag’ Laws Noticeably Absent From Final Proposal

KHN Morning Briefing

Following the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, Republican Gov. Mike DeWine promised to “do something” about gun violence in the state. While he previously voiced support for “red flag” laws, the governor’s administration felt that the legislation would be “inadequate and unworkable.” The proposal in DeWine’s final version builds on the existing “pink slip” law, which allows for people assessed by mental health experts in a psychiatric facility.

How Long Is It Safe To Play Football? CTE Risk, Severity Increases With Years Played, Study Shows

KHN Morning Briefing

The study in the Annals of Neurology reported athletes who played more than 14.5 years were 10 times more likely to develop the brain-wasting disease, though several players with careers 15 years or longer were found not to have CTE. Public health news looks at a possible virus behind a rare disease paralyzing children, eye exams aided by smartphones, the toll chronic stress plays on blood sugar levels, unsafe sleeping positions while pregnant, a popular video game’s impact on children’s brains, and new worries for parents about sleepovers, as well.

Health Officials Urge Americans To Get Flu Vaccines ‘Right Now’ After Australia Experiences Early, Serious Outbreak

KHN Morning Briefing

In 2017, an American outbreak in which 79,000 people died followed Australia’s worst outbreak in 20 years. The same strain might dominate this year. In other public health news: brain stimulation for severe depression, a problem with the new meat guidelines, disaster-response systems, childhood academic struggles, living with disabilities on YouTube, dangers of clean eating, relief migraines, managing screen time, taking “verbal autopsies,” and more.

Brutal Killings In NYC Highlight Dangerous Conditions Faced By Homeless

KHN Morning Briefing

Following the rampage, the city will be sending mental-health outreach teams to the area where the attacks occurred to provide emotional support and connect people to appropriate care. But advocates say officials need to address the root causes of such incidents–the homeless crisis.

‘Disheartening And Disappointing’: Suicides Among Active U.S. Military Continue To Rise

KHN Morning Briefing

The suicide rate for active-duty troops jumped 34% from 2013 to 2018, according to a new Department of Defense report. The Army and Marine Corps experienced the highest suicide rates, but the trend has touched most of the military services. Only the Air Force saw a decrease. Acting Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy and Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville called the report “disheartening and disappointing” in a joint statement.