Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Oregon Has Botched Efforts To Move Patients Out Of Restrictive Psychiatric Facilities, Investigation Finds

KHN Morning Briefing

The Oregonian/OregonLive launched an investigation into the Oregon Health Authority’s management of moving patients out of specialized care. Chris Bouneff, director of Oregon’s branch of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said the newsroom’s findings are “disturbing.” “We don’t have many others who look after us,” Bouneff said of people with severe mental illness. “And if that state agency can’t do it, and it didn’t do it in this instance, who can we trust?”

Many Of The Worst Mass Shootings In Recent Memory All Have Something In Common: AR-15 Style Rifles. Why?

KHN Morning Briefing

The rounds from that style of weapon are three times faster and strike with more than twice the force of other bullets. “Organs aren’t just going to tear or have bruises on them, they’re going to be, parts of them are going to be destroyed,” says Cynthia Bir. In other public health news: gene-edited babies, alcohol, vitiligo, the cautious generation, cancer, CBD, and more.

Struggling To Curb Veteran Suicide, VA Approves Costly Depression Drug Amid Accusations It’s Rushing The Process

KHN Morning Briefing

The agency is racing to get the drug through the approval process after President Donald Trump signaled support for the treatment. But psychiatrists and medical researchers, including some at the VA, raised questions about the drug’s effectiveness and safety, and Democratic lawmakers question why the decision-making on the drug has been so rushed.

Despite International Kerfuffle Over Chinese Scientist’s Decision To Gene-Edit Human Embryos, Others Want To Follow In His Path

KHN Morning Briefing

Denis Rebrikov, a Russian scientist, claims he has developed a safe way to gene-edit babies. “How it can be unethical if we will make [a] healthy baby instead of diseased?” Rebrikov told NPR during his first broadcast interview. “Why? Why [is it] unethical?” The issue has gained international attention as of late, with most experts in the field recommending caution. In other public health news: robotic ducks to help kids with cancer, a look at federally funded research, the flu, parenting, herbs and modern medicine, skeletal changes from phone use, and more.

You Can Still Be Healthy With A High BMI Yet Many Fertility Clinics Close Door To Obese Women

KHN Morning Briefing

Does it make sense, medically or ethically, when fertility clinics refuse to treat prospective mothers they consider too large? One woman was treated coldly at a clinic and told she was too fat to get pregnant. “Have more sex and lose the weight,” the technician said to her. In other public health news: murders of black transgender women, sleeping without drugs, eating expired foods, shortage of geriatricians, lessons on modern technology, living after cardiac arrest and obesity’s ties to prostate cancer.

When It Comes To Hospitals, Robocalls Aren’t Just A Nuisance But A Life-Or-Death Challenge

KHN Morning Briefing

Hospitals “can’t not pick them up,” said Steven Cardinal, a top security official at the Medical University of South Carolina. “They don’t have any indicator it’s a spoof until they answer it.” Officials across the country are terrified for the day that their phone systems can’t keep up with the spam on top of a real emergency. And there doesn’t seem to be any relief in sight. In other health tech news: a data breach ends in bankruptcy, a look at how 13 became the age of adulthood for the Internet, and e-prescriptions.

As Inmate Suicide Rates Soar, Experts Blame ‘Culture Of Dismissiveness’ Toward Prison Mental Health Needs

KHN Morning Briefing

An investigation between The Associated Press and Capital News Service found serious problems with how inmates who have mental health struggles fare in local jails across the country. While experts call for better targeted response to inmates’ needs, local prisons already struggling to stay afloat and say “we’re not the nation’s psychologists.”

Looking For New Answers To Aging Well: What Bats In Belfries, Marmosets In Mountains Might Tell

KHN Morning Briefing

While animals have long been studied in medical research, a new wave of researchers is looking for different answers. “The goal isn’t to increase the number of 120-year-olds who are living in nursing homes. We want more 80- and 90-year-olds who are living independently,” says Corinna Ross, a primatologist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute. More aging news reports on grip strength, defining “old” and the power of laughter.

Despite Targeted Raids And Take Downs, Opioid Market Continues To Thrive On The Dark Web

KHN Morning Briefing

The fight against online drug sales often resembles the war on drugs in the physical world: There are raids. Sites are taken down. A few people are arrested. And after a while the trade and markets pop back up somewhere else. In other news on the epidemic: two teen brothers’ fatal overdoses, looking to Europe for ways to handle the crisis, expanded treatment for Medicaid patients, and more.

One Of The Biggest Myths About The AIDS Epidemic Is That It’s Over

KHN Morning Briefing

Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, deputy commissioner for the Division of Disease Control of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, talks with The New York Times about his philosophy in addressing the AIDS epidemic. In other public health news: breast milk, blood donations, gene tests, protecting your DNA, spousal abuse, and more.

The Anatomy Of A Pandemic: A Look Back On The H1N1 Outbreak Ten Years Later

KHN Morning Briefing

A Stat reporter delves into what it was like to be at the starting point of a pandemic. It’s not quite the Hollywood version replete with bio-hazard suits and swoon-worthy scientists. In other public health news: the Dengue fever, a potential Alzheimer’s breakthrough, asthma treatments, vaping, musical pitch, HIV, hand sanitizer, and more.