Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Series Of Restrictive Arkansas Abortion Laws Including 18-Week Ban Blocked Again By Federal Judge

KHN Morning Briefing

U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker granted a preliminary injunction preventing the state from enforcing the restrictions: an 18-week ban, a mandate that physicians performing abortions be board-certified or board-eligible in obstetrics and gynecology, and a ban on anyone seeking the procedure because of a Down syndrome diagnosis. Abortion news comes out of Alabama and Illinois, as well.

For Many Latinos, The Hatred-Driven El Paso Shooting Is ‘The Death Of The American Dream’

KHN Morning Briefing

Latinos, regardless of immigration status, across the country were shaken by the shootings — a lethal exhibition of the increased racism and vitriol directed toward them. “It’s really hard to be alive as an immigrant right now and to not be sick and exhausted,” said Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, 30. “It feels like being hunted.” Meanwhile, experts warn that mass shootings can come in clusters and be contagious. In other news from the shootings: a look into the El Paso medical center that handled the victims; President Donald Trump plans to visit the cities; experts question if the death penalty would really be a deterrent; and more.

Democrats Invoke Emotional, Personal Experiences With Gun Violence In Messaging Shift For Party

KHN Morning Briefing

Even a few years ago, it was politically fraught for Democrats to take a fierce and vocal stance against guns. “Since 2008 or 2004, we’ve continued to have, both in intensity and quantity, more and more of these horrific shootings that capture the mind’s eye and public attention,” said Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who runs a rural state with a strong hunting tradition. “My family hasn’t been immune from that.” Other Democrats on the presidential trail are also using stronger language to urge for more restrictions.

Back-To-Back Shootings Spur Bipartisan Support For ‘Red Flag’ Bill That’s Not As Controversial As Background Checks

KHN Morning Briefing

President Donald Trump gave political cover to Republicans when he signaled his support for some kind of “red flag” legislation, which allows loved ones and law enforcement to take guns away from those they suspect might harm themselves or others. Some experts, however, question the effectiveness of such proposals and say that despite several “red flags” troubled people still slip through the cracks and end up going on to commit the mass shootings.

Climate Change Raises New Concerns About Large Areas Of World That Could Run Out Of Water

KHN Morning Briefing

News on the environment looks at the increasing risk of running out of water, a real possibility in 17 countries that use almost all their water, and new evidence that using fans really is OK during extreme heat waves despite warnings to the contrary. Other environmental news comes from California, Georgia and New York.

Flurry Of States Passed Red Flag Laws, But There’s Little Research On Their Impact At Reducing Gun Violence

KHN Morning Briefing

President Donald Trump and other lawmakers are boosting the idea of red flag laws, which allow loved ones and law enforcement to take guns away from someone they suspect may hurt themselves or others. Although there’s strong evidence that they reduce suicides, beyond that little research has been done on such protection orders’ effectiveness. Furthermore, psychology experts say a significant number of mass shooters are in their late teens to early 20s, when signs of severe mental illness may not yet be observable.

Following Cries Of ‘Do Something,’ Ohio Governor To Lay Out Proposal On Gun Violence

KHN Morning Briefing

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) said anything was on the table but that any changes must be consistent with the Second Amendment and must be able to pass the Republican-dominated legislature — which could be a tall order. Republican state lawmakers previously opposed former Gov. John Kasich’s attempt to pass a red flag law.

Calif. Governor Expands State Task Force To Deal With Extremism, Demands Gender Be A Part Of Gun Violence Conversation

KHN Morning Briefing

California has some of the strictest gun laws in the country, and Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-Calif.) is taking further action following the weekend shootings. Newsom also said that leaders must address the fact that most shooters are male while talking about prevention. Meanwhile, data show that California’s new ammo background check legislation blocked more than 100 illegal sales in July. Media outlets look at how gun violence is being addressed across the country in the wake of the attacks.

Experts Quick To Rebut Damaging But Popular Talking Point That It’s ‘Mental Illness That Pulls The Trigger’

KHN Morning Briefing

“The overwhelming majority of people with mental illness are not violent and far more likely to be victims of violent crime than perpetrators of violence,” said the American Psychiatric Association. “Rhetoric that argues otherwise will further stigmatize and interfere with people accessing needed treatment.” But what does cause these shooters to lash out? Experts say it isn’t the video games that are also often blamed. There are contributing factors, like a radicalization of ideology, that can prove to be warning signs however.

Trump Blames Shootings On Video Games, Mental Illness, White Supremacy While Side-Stepping Accusations About Own Rhetoric

KHN Morning Briefing

President Donald Trump addressed the nation after two mass shootings over the weekend, pointing to internet bigotry, white supremacy and mental illness as root causes. “Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart and devours the soul,” he said. However, the president stopped short of endorsing any sweeping gun control measures, nor did he address charges that his own language and behavior contributes to the culture of racism and violence.

‘Nothing Short Of Epic’: As Measles Outbreak Raced Across County, Officials Created Innovative Strategies To Stave It Off

KHN Morning Briefing

The Washington Post looks back at some of the ways state leaders and public health officials reacted during the spread of the measles outbreak this year. “The new normal is getting more nuanced in our communication and better understanding these communities that are vaccine-hesitant,” said Michael Fraser, executive director of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.