KHN Morning Briefing

Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations

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Preventive Care Efforts Were Boosted Under ACA, But GOP’s Plan Would Make Them Vulnerable Again

Regular screenings and preventive care are responsible for catching serious problems before they become expensive disasters. But with the cuts under the GOP's proposed legislation, some worry the progress made through the Affordable Care Act will be lost. Meanwhile, the Republicans' plan depends on young people buying insurance even though that lesson was already learned, and a look at the winners and losers under the plan.

The Associated Press: Trump's No 'Dying In The Streets' Pledge Faces Reality Check
President Donald Trump has often said he doesn't want people "dying in the streets" for lack of health care. But in the United States, where chronic conditions are the major diseases, people decline slowly. Preventive care and routine screening can make a big difference for those at risk for things such as heart problems and cancer, especially over time. (Alonso-Zaldivar, 7/15)

The Associated Press: New GOP Health Care Bill Will Determine Winners, Losers
Republicans' latest health care plan would create winners and losers among Americans up and down the income ladder, and across age groups.It would give consumers more responsibility for their insurance choices, a goal long held by conservatives who argue that's key to a true health care market. Younger adults and healthy people in the solid middle class may find more agreeable options. But low-income people may not be able to afford coverage, along with older and sicker adults. (7/15)

In other news on the Republicans' proposed legislation —

The Wall Street Journal: Health-Law Taxes Divide The GOP, Signaling A Shift
Republican efforts to pass a health-care bill have revealed a party fissure on tax policy with potentially far-reaching repercussions. In his latest attempt to rewrite President Barack Obama’s signature health-care law, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) retained a 3.8% investment-income tax and a 0.9% payroll tax that apply to individuals earning more than $200,000 and married couples earning more than $250,000. (Rubin, 7/17)

Kaiser Health News: Podcast: What The Health? Senate Health Bill 2.0. Still On Life Support
Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Sarah Kliff of Vox.com and Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times discuss the changes to the proposed Senate health bill, and whether they can win the 50 votes needed to pass it. Plus, for “extra credit,” the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too. (7/14)

Des Moines Register: 58% Of Iowans Oppose Congress' Actions On Health Care, New Iowa Poll Shows
Few Iowans like how Congress is attempting to revamp the nation’s health care system, a new Des Moines Register/Mediacom Iowa Poll shows. Just 29 percent of Iowa adults say they mostly support the direction congressional Republicans are taking on health care, according to the poll. Twice as many — 58 percent — say they mostly oppose that direction. Thirteen percent are unsure. (Leys, 7/15)

Bloomberg: Obamacare's Pocketbook Problems Made Worse In GOP Health Bill 
Concern about patients spending too much of their own money on health care has driven the debate over repealing and replacing Obamacare. But the latest Senate Republican health bill does little to address those fears and may exacerbate them. The bill, rolled out anew on Thursday after a raft of Republican defections threatened to sink the original legislation, faces a narrow road to passage despite alterations aimed at winning over lawmakers who balked at the earlier draft. Two Republican Senators signaled their opposition; a third dissent could doom the measure, and a long-held GOP vow to overturn the Affordable Care Act. (Tracer and Edney, 7/14)

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