KHN Morning Briefing

Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations

full issue

Research Roundup: Early Hospital Discharges; Missed Vaccinations; Growth In Spending

Each week, KHN compiles a selection of recently released health policy studies and briefs.

JAMA Surgery: Costs And Consequences Of Early Hospital Discharge After Major Inpatient Surgery In Older Adults
Do fast-track discharge protocols and shorter postoperative length of stay after major inpatient surgery reduce overall surgical episode payments, or are there unintended increased costs because of postdischarge care? ... In a cross-sectional cohort study of 639 943 risk and postoperative complication–matched Medicare beneficiaries undergoing colectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, or total hip replacement, hospitals with shortest routine postoperative length of stay achieved lowest overall surgical episode payments and did not offset shorter hospital stays with greater postdischarge care spending. (Regenbogen et al., 5/17)

Annals of Internal Medicine: Missed Opportunities for Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination Among Departing U.S. Adult Travelers Receiving Pretravel Health Consultations
40 810 adult travelers were included [in an observational study in U.S. pretravel clinics]; providers considered 6612 (16%) to be eligible for MMR vaccine at the time of pretravel consultation. Of the MMR-eligible, 3477 (53%) were not vaccinated at the visit; of these, 1689 (48%) were not vaccinated because of traveler refusal, 966 (28%) because of provider decision, and 822 (24%) because of health systems barriers. Most MMR-eligible travelers who were not vaccinated were evaluated in the South (2262 travelers [65%]) or at nonacademic centers (1777 travelers [51%]). Nonvaccination due to traveler refusal was most frequent in the South (1432 travelers [63%]) and in nonacademic centers (1178 travelers [66%]). (Hyle et al., 5/16)

Urban Institute/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: The Evidence On Recent Health Care Spending Growth And The Impact Of The Affordable Care Act
Conventional wisdom holds that health care cost growth is high and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has done little to address the problem. However, overall increases in national health expenditures (NHE) since the law passed have been lower than anticipated, premiums and premium growth in the ACA’s health insurance marketplaces are high in some states but quite low in others, and growth in Medicare and Medicaid spending per enrollee has been very modest. NHE are still high, now at 18.3 percent of gross domestic product .... In this brief, we attempt to address several misconceptions about recent spending increases; these misconceptions are centered in three areas: the recent and projected growth in NHE the levels and recent growth of ACA marketplace premiums the recent and projected spending growth in the Medicaid program. (Holahan et al., 5/25)

Urban Institute: Medicaid/CHIP Participation Rates Rose Among Both Children And Parents In 2015
Using the 2013-2015 American Community Survey, this brief finds improvements for both parents and children in uninsurance, Medicaid/CHIP participation, and the number who are eligible for Medicaid/CHIP but not enrolled. Uninsurance fell nationally and in nearly every state, and the number of eligible but uninsured children fell to 2.1 million – declining by over half since 2008. Children’s participation reached 93.1 percent in 2015 (exceeding 90 percent in 36 states), while participation among parents rose to 80.2 percent, with larger gains between 2013 and 2015 in expansion states than nonexpansion states. Participation grew among every subgroup of children and parents examined. (Kenney et al., 5/17)

The Kaiser Family Foundation: Financing Family Planning Services For Low-Income Women: The Role Of Public Programs
Medicaid, the Title X Family Planning Program, and Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (PHSA) are the leading sources of federal funding for the over 10,000 safety-net clinics across the country that provide reproductive health services to low-income women, men, and teens. The Trump administration and the Republican leadership of the 115th Congress have proposed to block federal Medicaid funds from going to Planned Parenthood .... Changes to these programs and funding to the clinics that provide family planning services could limit the availability of contraceptive services, STI screenings and treatment, and preventive cancer screenings, along with other primary care services to low-income women. ... One in three low-income women reported that they obtained birth control from a family planning clinic such as Planned Parenthood or another health center or public health clinic. (Ranji et al., 5/11)

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