Latest Morning Briefing Stories

High Demand But Low Wages: How Workers Who Care For Aging Patients Struggle

KHN Morning Briefing

Work as a caregiver can be physically demanding and complex, but people in the field often have to take two jobs to make ends meet. “We’re limited in what we pay because of reimbursements,” Paul Randolph, intake supervisor at Excel Home Care, tells The Wall Street Journal.

After Years Of Political Bickering Over Medicaid Expansion, Choice Will Go Directly To Voters In Four Red States

KHN Morning Briefing

The measures are being watched closely as a method to expanding Medicaid in states with resistant legislatures. Ballot initiatives “are so powerful because they strip away from the partisanship and the tribalism that dominates so much of our politics,” said Jonathan Schliefer, executive director of The Fairness Project. “When it comes to health care, the biggest gap isn’t between Republicans and Democrats. It’s between politicians and everyone else.” Meanwhile, The Washington Post fact checks campaign ads that claim Republicans will get rid of Medicare.

What You Need To Know About The Upcoming Medicare Open Enrollment Season

KHN Morning Briefing

Open enrollment for Medicare and prescription drug plans will begin Oct. 15 for coverage in 2019 and close Dec. 7. One change this year is that seniors can try a Medicare Advantage plan for up to three months and if they don’t like it, they can switch to another Advantage plan or enroll in traditional Medicare.

Osteoporosis Drug Given By IV May Greatly Lowers Risk Of Fractures For Women In Earlier Stages Of Bone Loss

KHN Morning Briefing

“I think it’s a breakthrough,” Clifford Rosen, an endocrinologist and physician, said of the study. While researchers have known that older women with osteoporosis benefit from drugs called bisphosphonates, this study supports their value for younger women with less brittle bones. Some, however, remain cautious. In other news on aging, two big studies focus on Alzheimer’s prevention.

Nutrition Studies Plagued By ‘Credibility Problem,’ Critics Say

KHN Morning Briefing

A Cornell University food researcher’s discredited work is symptomatic of a pervasive problem with food and health studies, according to a group of scientists, who say part of the problem stems from the need to publish often. In other public health news, there are reports on flu, twins, pregnancy, nursing homes, living donors, teen girls, anxiety, vaping and more.