Latest Morning Briefing Stories

In Second Month Of Arkansas’ Work Requirements, Thousands Fail To Report Hours Even Though They Meet Them

KHN Morning Briefing

The beneficiaries have to log hours through other programs, so officials know that they’re meeting them and simply just not reporting them. Critics warned of this scenario before work requirements were instituted because, according to analysts, one in three Medicaid adults never use a computer or the internet and four in ten do not use email. Medicaid news comes out of Ohio, as well.

Administration Optimistic It Can Sidestep Judge’s Ruling On Kentucky Medicaid Work Requirements

KHN Morning Briefing

The judge blocked Kentucky’s attempt to add work requirements to its Medicaid program because officials had failed to consider the estimate that it would cause 95,000 low-income people to lose coverage. Now, Trump administration officials say that if they provide a fuller record showing that they considered the evidence that they’ll be able to move forward.

A Green Card Or Health Care? Possible Trump Proposal Could Make Legal Immigrants Have To Choose

KHN Morning Briefing

Experts are most worried about the way the rule, which would expand the definition of “public charge,” will affect children’s health. The proposal is set to include: children’s health insurance; Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Plan (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps); Supplemental Nutritional Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC; tax credits for low- to moderate-income families; and housing and transit subsidies.

HHS Cracks Down On Drug Companies Taking Advantage Of Loophole In Medicaid’s Complex Payment Structure

KHN Morning Briefing

The new guidance, which officials say will cut back on the companies’ “abusive behavior,” concerns the rebates that drug makers have to pay back to states when a patient receives one of their medicines. In other pharmaceutical news: the administration is preparing to put action behind its rhetoric on drug pricing; some say Medicare’s new negotiating powers could lead to increased hospitalizations; and more.

If Legal Immigrants Used Medicaid They Could Be Denied Green Card Under Proposed Plan From Trump

KHN Morning Briefing

Under long-standing federal law, a noncitizen can be denied admission or permanent legal status if immigration authorities determine the person is likely to become a “public charge” — that is, someone reliant on government programs. The Trump administration’s proposal would dramatically expand the criteria used to determine whether someone is likely to become a burden.