Latest Morning Briefing Stories

Another 4,100 Dropped From Arkansas’ Medicaid Rolls After Failing To Properly Report Work Hours

KHN Morning Briefing

And the report found that another 4,800 people are at risk at losing coverage if they don’t meet the work requirement by the end of this month. For critics of the requirements, it’s their worst fears realized. “This is an absolute train wreck, and it is a slow-moving train wreck that the state can stop at any time,” said Sam Brooke, deputy legal counsel for the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of three groups that had sued Arkansas over the mandate.

American Hospital Association, Other Health Care Groups Speak Out About Trump’s Proposed Green Card Policy

KHN Morning Briefing

Experts say that hundreds of thousands of children and other members of low-income legal immigrant families could drop out of public programs providing health care, nutrition and housing assistance due to the rule, which directs immigration officials to take into account things such as Medicaid assistance when determining green card eligibility. Meanwhile, House Democrats have introduced a bill to block the Trump administration’s policy.

GOP Indiana Senate Candidate Touts His Company’s Health Care Model But Some Employees Beg To Disagree

KHN Morning Briefing

Businessman Mike Braun is challenging incumbent Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) in a tight U.S. Senate race. With health care on the front of many voters’ minds, Braun points to his own company’s health care model. Some workers, however, said it isn’t like real insurance. “If I did ever have to go to the hospital, I’d have been screwed,” said Heath Kluemper, a former employee at Meyer Distributing.

‘Zero Tolerance’ Crackdown Was Riddled With Communication Failures, Planning Shortfalls And Chaos, Watchdog Finds

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HHS investigators describe a poorly coordinated interagency process that left distraught parents with little or no knowledge of their children’s whereabouts, according to an unpublished internal watchdog report obtained by The Washington Post. Meanwhile, the government is now moving detained children in middle-of-the-night journeys to a tent city in Texas, and an official downplays the impact of the administration’s expanded “public charge” policy.

Medicaid Expansion As A Democrat Talking Point In A Red State? It’s Not As Far-Out As It Once Might Have Been

KHN Morning Briefing

Most of Democrats’ past attempts to campaign on the health law’s Medicaid expansion have fallen flat, but state Rep. Beto O’Rourke talks about bringing more people into the program at every campaign event as he campaigns against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). O’Rourke isn’t the only Democrat pushing expansion — gubernatorial hopefuls are seizing on the issue as well.

Verma Defends Work Requirements: They’re ‘Not Some Subversive Attempt To Just Kick People Off Of Medicaid’

KHN Morning Briefing

The work requirements have drawn criticism after more than 4,000 Arkansas residents lost Medicaid coverage after three months of failing to report their hours. CMS Administrator Seema Verma once again touted the number of people who found work underneath the rules, and said the government would continue monitoring the data closely going forward. Meanwhile, the battle over Medicaid expansion continues to play out in Maine and a study looks at the effects of expansion for rural residents.

Medicaid Beneficiaries Won’t Report Hours If They Don’t Know The Requirements Exist

KHN Morning Briefing

Thousands of people were dropped from Arkansas’ Medicaid rolls after failing to report new required work hours, but advocates say that’s because people don’t realize they have to. The federal government invested millions into getting the word out about the health law, and still it took years for people to understand what it was. States have far fewer resources and time.